Stock up on Beef!

If you drive around the Central Coast of California, you are bound to see happy California cows roaming the hillsides. With so many health benefits to grass-fed and grass-finished beef, we are lucky to have local producers here in the Paso area.

My go to source is Templeton Hills Beef. I know the owners well and am really impressed with the care they put into growing and managing their herds. Another perk is they deliver for free within the Paso Robles area (see their website for shipping to other areas).

It has been a long time since I indulged in grass-fed beef and decided it was time to order a box of some of my favorite cuts. I also have been reading so much about the benefits of bone broth and the bone broth diet, that I also ordered a couple of boxes of bones and decided to experiment with broth.

My order included a mix of knuckle bones (also known as soup bones), leg bones, riblettes and neck bones. The trick to getting a true bone broth (versus the traditional beef broth) is to use lots of bones (with plenty of marrow and cartilage) and simmer for a very long time (12-24 hours).

I made three different batches:

  • BATCH ONE – The first batch used up the less meaty bones. For these I sprinkled with sea salt and roasted in the oven at 450F for an hour prior to starting the broth — the result was a darker broth with more intense flavor (I simply used carrots, onions, salt, bay leaves and water to create the broth that was simmered in a slow cooker for 24 hours)
  • BATCH TWO – This was a mix of VERY meaty soup bones, a few riblettes, and some not so meaty leg bones. This batch was made the same as batch one but simmered in a large stock pot on the stove for 12 hours. I decided it still needed some more time, so I refrigerated the pot overnight (I didn’t want to leave the gas stove on all night) and the next day let it simmer for an extra 12 hours.
  • BATCH THREE – This batch was spiced up with plenty of garlic, pepper, and several herbs. It was also exclusively the meaty soup bones. Since the soup bones looked like little roasts, I expected this to be the batch with the most beef flavor (and I had already learned the extra time really helps, so this one also receive 24 hours of simmering).

I was happy with all three batches but I do have to say I think roasting the bones first was well worth the effort. Another learning exercise is that the meat on the bones doesn’t seem to add a lot of extra flavor, so going with some cheaper bones isn’t a bad thing. For future batches, I think I’ll go with the basic ingredients and then just flavor with garlic, herbs and spices as I go.

For now, I plan on sipping away on the broth I made (my freezer is full) and hope it really does help me sleep better, lose weight, have better skin and reduce some wrinkles!

Stay tuned to hear about what I did with all the other cuts of grass-fed beef. Spoiler alert — there was wine involved with those meals.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *