Albariño Summit Paso Robles 2016

Yesterday I attended the first ever Albariño Summit at Brecon Estate. The event began with a short seminar and was followed by a tasting where 24 wineries from California’s Central Coast poured their Albariño. There was also live music and Spanish-themed food for attendees to enjoy.

The Seminar prior to the tasting was a fabulous idea since it provided information regarding the history, winemaking styles and varietal characteristics of Albariño.

Apparently, there is still some debate regarding the origins of the grape: some say Portuguese, some say Spanish.  We were able to taste an Albariño from the Northern Portugal where some of the best Albariño is made and also a tank sample from Southern Portugal (this would not be bottled standalone but instead would be blended with other varietals). It was interesting to taste the cooler climate versus the warmer — and of course this came in handy when tasting Paso Robles based versus coastal Albariño later in the event.

During the seminar we also tasted a Tangent Albariño and heard from their winemaker. I was surprised to hear that there is currently less than 200 acres of Albariño planted in California. Tangent Wines, located in the Edna Valley, has the most planted acres. Clearly this is a varietal they feel does really well in their vineyards.

The final taste was a Brecon Albariño from their library. It was fun to taste a wine and hear about it while sitting by the very tank in which it was made.

A Few Facts

  • Prior to 1970 Albariño was not bottled as a standalone varietal in Portugal or Spain — today it is very popular, especially in the Northern areas of both countries
  • Albariño is a vigorous vine and will grow into old age with a large trunk and plenty of vigorous shoots. The vines are sensitive to direct sunlight and heat. The vine is easily identified by its heart shaped leaves.
  • The aromatics of this wine come from the grape (versus fermentation in oak). As a result, winemakers will often leave the crushed grapes in contact with the skin for greater aromatic extraction and will typically make the wine in stainless steel. Although, as we heard from the Brecon winemaker, it is sometimes aged oak barrels (he uses neutral oak and lets the wine sit on the lees).
  • Typical aromatics include: pine needles, turpentine, rose petal, banana and peach. There is also a salty element to Albariño that makes it pair extremely well with a wide range of seafood.
  • The grape is typically picked with a high acidity and can have a slight hint of green. As the wine ages it tends to show more yellow.

The Grand Tasting at Brecon, with plenty of trees for shade, was the perfect venue for an outdoor tasting. I wish I could say I tasted all of the Albariño poured; however, with 24 wineries pouring 1-2 wines that was way more than I wanted to tackle in a single event. I will say there were a few that really stood out including: Bodegas Paso Robles, Barr Estate, Shale Oak, TangentPear Valley and Per Cazo.

This was a lovely event complete with guitar music and food paired with the wine (ceviche, empanadas and fruit). The crowd was relaxed and I was happy to run into a few friends with several from other local wineries.

I hope they do this event again next year!

Photo Gallery (click to enlarge).

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